Rebuttal Of The Day

Customer:

“Are you selling leads?” Or “I don’t buy leads”

Agent:

“Even though I’m not selling leads, I’m giving you exposure on average of 4,000 times a month” || “I’m not selling leads or a list of prospects to chase down. How this works is I custom create your ad and deliver ___ impressions/views directly to to individuals who are seeking your services. I’m confident you see the value, right?”

Whether searching for your first job, changing careers, or moving from military life to the general workforce, it is always a good idea to create a well-rounded resume. In today’s technology-driven world, the job market is largely structured around online job search platforms. With these utilities, you simply input your personal information and work history, and if you have one you upload a resume. While many job-seekers are content with filling out a job application, a resume shows a potential employer that you have a sense of professionalism and conduct yourself in a business-like manner.  It is also a way to show a potential employer who you are in ways that cannot be shown on a basic employment application. This single document could be the difference between you being told “Can you start next week” or “We’ll give you a call”. Of course, if you are young and new to the job market, your resume may not have very much on it except your educational history–but there is nothing wrong with that. The vast majority of employers value honesty, and if you have a resume with little more than an educational history, there’s a good chance you be looked upon in a brighter light than the individual who has a 3-page resume showing that they’ve had 15 different jobs over the course of a year (a sign of an unreliable or untrustworthy employee). So, what should be on your resume? What do employers want to see? This guide will help you create a professional resume that exposes your strengths and gives you an upper-hand in the job market. Of course, if your plan is to go work at a fast food restaurant, you won’t likely need a resume. But we both know your aspirations are much higher than that. Resume Vs CV What is a CV? CV stands for Curriculum Vitae, and is a detailed summary of you professional, educational an experiential background. Whereas a resume is more of a brief summary of the above elements with the addition of a personal history. Resumes are meant to be concise and focus solely on the professional aspects of one’s career. A resume is generally a single page with a maximum of three pages for applicants seeking senior or management roles. Resumes are commonly used in private sector jobs and are often geared toward the type of employment sought. CVs are generally longer and contain more detail which outlines a large amount of a person’s professional history and accomplishments. CVs are very often more than two pages in length. CVs are most common in the public sector and learning institutions, and most businesses prefer the resume. Resume Formats: There are three primary resume formats: chronological, functional, and combined. CHRONOLOGICAL Most job seekers use what is called the “reverse” chronological format. It is the most simple format and one that employers see the most. So they may see it as easy to read or they may see it as “ordinary”. Work history and experience recieve the most attention with the chronological format, with items listed in order from the most recent to the oldest, and work experience is at the beginning after the objectives. What to include in a chronological resume:
  • Contact Information
  • Resume Summary (objectives)
  • Professional Title
  • Work Experience
  • Skills
  • Education
  • Additional Information
FUNCTIONAL This functional format is also called the skill-based format. Its emphasis is on skills relevant to the position being sought. However, many employers are unfamiliar with this format and it is unpopular because it doesn’t give enough attention to past work experience. What to include in the functional resume format:
  • Contact Information
  • Resume Summary (objectives)
  • Professional Title
  • Skills Summary (bulk of resume)
  • Additional Skills
  • Work Experience
  • Education
COMBINATION The combination resume format does exactly what it states: it combines the best of the reverse chronological and functional formats to create a readable resume that places emphasis on work experience and skills. This format is becoming more popular, but many employers still prefer the reverse chronological. What to include in the combination resume format:
  • Contact Information
  • Skills Summary
  • Additional Skills
  • Work Experience
  • Education
This format is very flexible, so content can be rearranged. For example, if you want to place emphasis on your work experience instead of your skills, you can rotate the Work Experience section to the top below Contact Information. Keep in mind that work experience isn’t the only factor to consider when selecting a format. You should also consider the position, company and industry that you are pursuing. Formatting is just one way that you tailor your resume to a specific job or company, and an eye-catching resume layout can make your job application to stand out amidst hundreds of others. So, if you are applying for a job in a more creative industry, like marketing or design, then you probably don’t want to use a traditional resume format. Sample Resume: Below you will find an example of a basic resume. You will notice that primary areas are covered:
  1. Objectives – What job you are seeking and why
  2. Job Experience – What work experience you may have in the area or in un-related areas. Essentially this is your past work experience.
  3. Skills – Any skills you may have that will help you perform your duties (i.e. typing, database management)
  4. Education – Details of your educational history and any associated achievements
  5. References – Other professionals that can provide an employer with good feedback about you as an employee (do not use family and friends!)
You can also include information about fluency in other languages or computer coding as these are sought-after in today’s market (but won’t break a deal). Anything that makes you stand out–in a positive way–can be helpful. If you are a veteran or are currently in the reserves, make sure to make special note of this in your resume. While the job you are seeking may have no connection to anything you did wile serving, your service shows a great deal about you as a person. Many employers view veterans as hard workers and quick learners.

 


RESUME TIPS AND TRICKS Most document programs, like Microsoft Word, have templates that can be used to help you create a professional looking resume. There are also online services that can help you create a great looking resume. If you are new to the resume writing game, there’s nothing to be afraid of. If you are honest and detailed, you will have an effective resume. In terms of honesty, remember that our world is highly connected via the internet and anything can be verified. For more information on resumes try the following links; www.novoresume.com